Le Mans 24 Hours Driving Guide

Le Mans 24 Hours Driving Guide

by

Wolf Feather/Jamie Stafford
FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM

 
Version: FINAL
Completed: November 7, 2001

 
 
Initial Version Completed August 19, 2001


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CONTENTS
Spacing and Length
Permissions
Introduction
Game Modes
Tires
General Tips
Time Trial Tips
Time Trial Goal Times
Surviving an Endurance Race
The Circuits
Completely Subjective Section
Details: Le Mans
Details: Bugatti
Details: Brno
Details: Donington National
Details: Donington Grand Prix
Details: Catalunya National
Details: Catalunya Grand Prix
Details: Suzuka East
Details: Suzuka West
Details: Suzuka Grand Prix
Details: Road Atlanta
Details: Road Atlanta National
Details: Reverse Courses
Unlocking Circuits (Spoilers!!!!!)
Unlocking Cars (Spoilers!!!!!)
Wish List
Contact


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SPACING AND LENGTH
For optimum readability, this driving guide should be viewed/printed using a monowidth font, such as Courier. Check for appropriate font setting by making sure the numbers and letters below line up:

1234567890123456789012345678901234567890123456789012
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

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PERMISSIONS
This guide may ONLY be posted on FeatherGuides, GameFAQs.com, PSXCodez.com, F1Gamers, Cheatcc.com, Absolute-PlayStation.com, InsidePS2Games.com, RedCoupe, gamesover.com, CheatPlanet.com, The Cheat Empire, a2zweblinks.com, Gameguru, cheatingplanet.com, vgstrategies.com, hellzgate, ps2fantasy.com, and neoseeker.com.
Permission is granted to download and print one copy of this game guide for personal use.

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INTRODUCTION
I feel extremely fortunate to have been able to watch fifteen of the 24 Hours of Daytona in February 2001 — the first and only time popular NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt was able to compete in this classic event. While I personally prefer true road courses to stadium courses, I was still caught up in the beauty and artistry of the grueling event. It was really quite special to see cars speeding along on the tight, narrow pavement in the middle of the night, barely able to see anything beyond the glow of the headlights. I also enjoyed the interviews with race teams and spectators alike as they also fought to survive their grueling roles in the race. The changing weather conditions made this all even more difficult for everyone involved. It was my first chance to watch an endurance race, and I instantly fell in love with what was for me a brand new type of racing.

Le Mans 24 Hours brings this experience and excitement home. The LONG endurance races — Petit Le Mans (10 hours) and Le Mans (24 hours) — are extremely true to Nature in this respect. The tracking of the shadows as the sun crosses the sky during the day, the tracking of the moon and stars as they cross the night sky, the glare of headlights and taillights, the sound of the engines piercing the air, the drying of the circuit as a long, drenching rain gives way to clear, sunny skies; many of these changes are not easily noticed, as so much of your attention is focused on the mechanics of the race itself, and on anticipating the next corner. The exquisite detail afforded to the realism is breathtaking — IF you happen to notice it as you drive!!!
This guide comprises many elements, from listing the unlockable courses and cars, to giving general tips, to providing detailed circuit information. As for this latter point, some of the detail information — with appropriate modifications - comes from the driving guide I wrote for F1 Championship Season 2000 (itself based on the guide I wrote for F1 2000); this only applies to those circuits which are common between these games.

For ALL circuits, where the corner/segment names are known, I have translated these names to English and dropped any accent markings, as standard text-only Internet documents are based on the English-language ASCII character set. Also, circuit detail information is for dry-conditions daylight driving; appropriate modifications are required for nighttime driving and driving in other weather conditions.

I have also included a section on tires. Much of the information for this section comes from my GT3: Tires Guide, with appropriate modifications.

All twelve possible courses (including the three reverse courses) are listed here, with detailed driving instructions for each (except the reverse courses); see Unlocking Circuits (Spoilers!!!!!) below for details.

ALL of the advertised 70+ cars in the game are listed, based on my own progress in the game. See Unlocking Cars (Spoilers!!!!!) below for details.

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GAME MODES
Le Mans 24 Hours features five game modes:

1.) Quick Race allows you to immediately get started racing. Only four courses are initially available, however, more courses (including the three reverse-direction courses, all unlocked simultaneously) will be unlocked as you win races; see Unlocking Circuits (Spoilers!!!!!) below for details. However, when first playing Le Mans 24 Hours (or ANY racing game with a Time Trial, Free Run, or similar mode), it would be best to start with Time Trail instead to learn the many courses.

2.) Championship presents you with increasingly-difficult championship series; only the Rookie GT Championship is initially available, but winning each series unlocks the next series. However, the circuits listed in the game manual for each championship series are not necessarily the same circuits actually used in the game.

3.) Le Mans mode allows you to race for varying amounts of time in either Petit Le Mans (up to 10 hours at Road Atlanta) or Le Mans 2000 (up to 24 hours). Winning at each race length (measured in time) unlocks more cars; see Unlocking Cars (Spoilers!!!!!) below for details.

4.) Multiplayer allows for one-on-one competition.

5.) Time Trial is a great place to begin, allowing you to learn the courses on your own pace, with no other vehicles on the circuits with you to distract you. Once you learn the courses, this is where you can really work to improve your lap times. Beat the Goal Time for each course (normally two to four seconds slower than the Record Time for each course) to unlock a bonus car. Only four courses are initially available in Time Trial, but more will be opened as you win races in Quick Race mode; see Unlocking Circuits (Spoilers!!!!!) below for details.

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TIRES
A very important issue in tire selection actually involves horsepower. The chosen tires need to have some measure of durability, or else you will be stopping in Pit Lane to change tires extremely often. In other words, don’t allow the car’s horsepower to overdrive the tires’ ability to function properly.

In the event that the chosen tires wear out too much, cornering at any respectable speed will be virtually impossible, instead causing a nearly-uncontrollable slide into a barrier or into another vehicle. Strong acceleration will likely cause the vehicle to spin. A good driver will not let this happen very often; an expert driver will NEVER let this happen. Always keep an eye on your tire indicators, and plan ahead. If possible, choose tires which will last as least as long as your fuel load.

When the tire indicators are green, the tires provide you with the best possible grip for that set of tires. The amount of time the tire indicators remain in the green color range depends on your driving style, the amount of time off-course (in the grass or sand) or banging the barriers (or other cars), and the selection of tire compound.

As the tire indicators switch to yellow, you need to start taking better care of your tires. You will likely experience slides when cornering.

One of the best ways to reduce the durability of the tires is to corner at high speeds. The manual for Gran Turismo 3 gives an excellent, detailed description of what occurs with the tires when cornering. In short, cornering at high speeds causes a high percentage of the tire to be used for speed, and a low percentage to be used for the actual cornering. To combat this and thus extend the durability of the tires, try to brake in a STRAIGHT line before reaching a turn, thus reducing overall speed, resulting in a lower percentage of the tires to be used for speed and a greater percentage instead used for cornering.

Note that if the percentage of the tires used for speed is too high compared to the percentage used for cornering, the car will slide and/or spin.

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GENERAL TIPS
For those not accustomed to racing games, Time Trial mode is by far the best place to start. This will allow you to try out cars in all three race categories, and also to learn the many courses without the distraction of other cars on the circuit with you; note that only four courses are initially available in Time Trial mode until other tracks are opened in Quick Race mode. Only really adept racing gamers (especially those who mostly play simulations) will be able to jump into a race on an unknown/unseen course and still perform fairly well.

For races with a standing start, DO NOT hold down the accelerator while you wait for the lights to change to green; this will not produce any benefits in Le Mans 24 Hours, and will actually put you far behind everyone else. Instead, keep off the accelerator, and try to time its application with the exact millisecond the lights turn green. This will reduce wheelspin due to excessive engine revs, thus applying all available power to the tires. On some circuits, if you use this strategy from a starting position at the very back of the grid, you can pass up to half of your competitors before reaching the first corner!!!

To the extent possible, keep to the approved racing surfaces (pavement, concrete, rumble strips). Grass will slow you down greatly, and sand traps (a.k.a. ‘kitty litter’) will essentially bring you to an immediate halt.

To pass, use the draft; this is especially effective in prototype cars. Or, if you feel a bit rowdy, ram or sideswipe the car in front of you (especially on or just before corner entry) to knock it out of your way and send it careening off-course. If you ram a car hard enough from behind, it is possible to send the other vehicle flipping end-over-end or into a continuous-roll accident; a ‘good’ place to do this is coming into the final chicane at Road Atlanta (full circuit).

If you do not choose to qualify, you will automatically start in last place; therefore, you have nothing to lose and A LOT to gain by qualifying. If you can qualify on Pole, that can mean up to twenty-three FEWER passes you will need to make as a race progresses. This may not be very significant in shorter races, but in the longer (Le Mans and Petit Le Mans) races, this could become a significant factor, especially in relation to Pit strategy.

If you are in first place and begin lapping other cars, those cars one or more laps behind you will have blue indicators on the track map.

Fortunately, should you run out of fuel, your race does not automatically come to an end like in some other racing games. Instead, you will simply start slowing, and will not be able to accelerate unless you can convince gravity to help you — IF you are fortunate enough to be heading downhill. Therefore, always keep an eye on your fuel gauge and be constantly mindful of the on-screen information displays at the top-center of the screen.

In a Championship series, if you can win all the initial races, you may be able to win the series overall even if you decide not to participate in one of the final races of the series; similarly, you may be able to skip a race at a circuit you do not particularly like (or, depending on your point of view, which does not particularly like you) and still be able to win the overall series if you can win at most or all of the remaining circuits. Unfortunately, Le Mans 24 Hours does not provide a Forfeit (or similar) option, so you are required to actually go out to the track; here, press Start, select Quit, and confirm.

If your goal is to unlock every possible car in the game, keep checking back to Progress (first select Options at the Main Menu). Use the left and right directional buttons to page through the various modes. Locked cars are silhouetted, while unlocked cars are shown in full color. Note that not all game modes provide the chance to unlock cars.

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TIME TRIAL TIPS
In Time Trial mode, you will always begin from a standing start. This means that it will not be possible to best the Goal Time on the initial lap. However, take this opportunity to practice a standing start with no other vehicles on the starting grid to distract you. Also, on this initial lap, brake VERY early and take corners VERY slowly to save the tires (see the next tip below); come up to full racing speed only in the final corner(s) of the circuit.

While there are no tire wear indicators on the screen when in Time Trial mode, tire wear does indeed occur; this is especially noticeable if using soft tires (you should be using soft tires anyhow, as they provide the best traction, which you will definitely need to better the Goal Times). Once you have completed about six to eight laps, the tires will no longer be of benefit to you, and will likely be a detriment to you; since any trip to Pit Lane is drive-through only with no servicing, you will be forced to quit Time Trial mode and return to gain fresh tires.

The Goal Time for most circuits is set so low that ANY off-course excursion will almost automatically put you out of contention for besting the Goal Time in that lap. In this case, get back on the pavement as quickly as possible, and drive slowly (like on the first lap) to save the tires, coming up to full racing speed only at the final corner(s) of the circuit in anticipation of your next 'hot lap.'

For all attempts at besting the Goal Time for a course, make sure to use as little fuel as the CPU will allow; this will reduce the weight of the fuel, thereby reducing the weight of the car and improving handling, accelerating, and braking. If you think fuel weight is not an issue, consider this: One gallon of water equals approximately eight pounds… and one gallon of fuel will NOT get you very far, especially not at Le Mans!!!!!

You will likely need to experiment with the car settings to see which gives you the best chance at besting the Goal Time for each circuit. I find that setting the Gear Box to Acceleration, the Engine to Sprint, and Downforce to High is a good starting set-up from which to work; be sure to adjust for personal preference and driving style.

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TIME TRIAL GOAL TIMES
In Time Trial mode, besting the posted Goal Times earns you a new car, except at the three reverse courses. Here are the Goal Times (including listed Goal Times for the reverse courses), listed here for convenience:

Le Mans                             3:34.000
Bugatti                             1:34.000  
Brno                                1:45.000
Donington National                  1:00.000  
Donington Grand Prix                1:21.000
Catalunya National                  1:01.000
Catalunya Grand Prix                1:34.000
Suzuka East                         0:40.000
Suzuka West                         1:01.000
Suzuka Grand Prix                   1:07.000  
Road Atlanta National               0:46.000
Road Atlanta                        1:09.000
Reverse Brno                        1:48.000
Reverse Donington National          1:02.000
Reverse Donington Grand Prix        1:23.000

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SURVIVING AN ENDURANCE RACE
While most of the races in Le Mans 24 Hours are relatively short by racing standards, some races are extremely long (especially the full Le Mans or Petit Le Mans races, at twenty-four and ten hours, respectively). Even the ‘short’ 100-minute Petit Le Mans race is relatively survivable.

However, the longer races require even more focus and concentration. Fatigue really begins to set in, especially for those not habituated to playing full-length races in non-endurance racing games such as F1 2001. While Le Mans 24 Hours allows for progress in longer races to be saved when in Pit Lane, you really lose the ‘flow’ of a given race if you save your progress and shut off the console after one stint in the car, making such a start-and-stop ‘method’ of racing quite a fragmented, arguably ‘postmodern’ method of racing.

For those who prefer to race for multiple stints at a time, here are some tips to help you keep your concentration and focus:

1.) Make sure you are well-rested and have plenty of time for driving multiple consecutive stints. To give you a benchmark, I average about forty-five minutes per stint at Le Mans (240 minutes) using full fuel and hard tires in a Closed Prototype vehicle. For the Petit Le Mans, I generally race a Closed Prototype car with fifty-percent fuel and soft tires, for thirty to forty minutes per stint.

2.) Make sure you are as comfortable as possible. Real-world race drivers often have specifically-molded seat cushions to help in this endeavor. While such specialized equipment is far too expensive to be used when playing console racing games, the concept is the same: Make sure you are in a comfortable chair, with appropriate cushions if necessary. If you like to have a footrest, make sure it is in place before beginning a race.

3.) While Le Mans 24 Hours does include music, it can quite easily become too repetitive to help you keep your concentration. If you have a stereo or radio separate from the sound system of your console and television, put on other music, perhaps a favorite CD (Lords of Acid, anyone???????).

4.) Adjust for real-world lighting before beginning a race. This is especially important for those — like myself — who have the console and television placed directly in front of a window due to the configuration of a small apartment or dorm room. Adjust the blinds or curtains to your liking so that any light coming in will not bother your eyes, especially when racing through the nighttime portion of races. Also, turn off or move lights whose shine reflects off the television screen.

5.) Have a drink handy. To be more realistic in relation to actual race drivers, only make use of the drink while in Pit Lane, thus simulating a driver receiving a small water bottle while the team handles car servicing. Or, simply have the drink next to you on a table so that you can quickly reach it for a quick sip down a straightaway; this would more or less simulate the in-helmet drink system used by some real-world race-drivers. (Of course, you could always ‘cheat’ and simply pause the game whenever you need a quick drink.) Note that drinks with high caffeine content (such as Jolt, sold in select markets in the States) may not be a good choice; if you run out of the drink well before the end of a stint, or long before you finish your planned multiple stints, you could experience a rather severe caffeine crash, which will adversely affect your driving performance and your concentration.

6.) Real-world drivers generally do not get a chance to eat during the race, except perhaps while the car is in Pit Lane for fuels and tires. A small plate or bowl of small snack foods might be useful. Small candies, crackers, cheeses, etc., may be good choices. If you are on a diet, first consult with your doctor or nutritionist for some good snack food possibilities.

7.) If you often download images, sounds, movies, etc., from the Internet and have a computer close to the console, set the computer to download a massive number of files before starting the game. Occasionally (preferably when alone on a long straightaway), glance over at the computer to check on the progress of the download. This will subconsciously keep your mind occupied on more than simply racing, thus forcing yourself to remain focused via extra effort. (And if you want to download a flood of Sailor Moon images from Usenet, this will save time, as you are obviously not using the computer personally while you race!!!)

8.) Avoid racing at times of the day (or night) when your body naturally tends to shut down. This applies to life in general, including choosing times between three-hour grad classes!!!!!

9.) Try to internalize the basics of racing before beginning an endurance race. If you can instinctively handle a J-turn, for example, the mechanics of safely navigating the corner will require less concentration. Perhaps the best possible means to learn the basics of racing with ‘hands-on’ experience is to complete ALL the license tests of any game in the Gran Turismo series; I particularly suggest the license tests in Gran Turismo 2.

10.) Simulate an actual Le Mans or Petit Le Mans race, without pausing or saving the game to continue later. Gather together several friends, and take turns doing the driving, changing drivers only at the Pit Stops as in an actual endurance race. Of course, this will give you an advantage over real-world endurance race drivers: They do not generally get to have good (or boring) conversations with friends while driving.

11.) If your car is lightning-fast compared to the other vehicles in the race, then after the first or second stint, always use 50% fuel. This should also allow you to use soft tires (if in dry conditions), as soft tires will generally begin to really wear out after about half of a fuel tank has been depleted (even faster if you have had many off-course excursions). This method will obviously have you sitting in Pit Lane more often, but that will give you more short breaks to catch your breath and let your adrenaline simmer for a moment.

12.) If playing with randomized weather, always be prepared to stop in Pit Lane to change tires. I have been able to run a number of laps successfully at Le Mans with soft tires when I should have been using intermediate tires, but my lap times were slower than if I had been using intermediate tires. Also, note that it takes approximately thirty minutes for the pavement to dry off after a long, hard, soaking rain, so this may well play into your choice of tires in a long endurance race.

13.) EVERY time you come to Pit Lane, SAVE YOUR PROGRESS!!!!! You never know when some fool will drive into a nearby telephone pole and cut off your electricity.

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THE CIRCUITS
Here are the circuits available in Le Mans 24 Hours, along with brief descriptions:

Le Mans                    The longest circuit of the game,
                           Le Mans is quite challenging,
                           especially when approaching the
                           Pits and Front Straightaway. Keep
                           an eye on the tire and fuel 
                           indicators; if you run out of fuel
                           or sufficient traction on the
                           back side of the circuit, you may
                           as well just quit the race.  
Bugatti                    This is the permanent section of
                           the Le Mans circuit.  High speeds 
                           are not really effective here with
                           all the technical corners.  
Brno                       If not for the many hills, this
                           would be a really great circuit.
                           As it is, great speeds can be
                           achieved here, especially with a
                           low-downforce set-up, but
                           cornering can be somewhat
                           difficult.  This circuit would be
                           EXCEPTIONALLY FUN with a 
                           motorcycle!!!!!  
Donington National         Good speeds can be achieved at
                           Donington, but there are several
                           tight corners which will really
                           challenge low-downforce cars.  
Donington Grand Prix       Identical to Donington National, 
                           with the addition of a nasty
                           chicane and two tight hairpins.  
Catalunya National         A quick course, but the first turn
                           (a hairpin) is sharp.  
Catalunya Grand Prix       An excellent circuit with high
                           speeds possible.  This circuit 
                           will be quite familiar to those
                           who have played F1-based games
                           such as F1 Championship Season
                           2000.  
Suzuka East                The Suzuka East circuit includes
                           the famous figure-eight crossover. 
                           Good use of the draft can be very
                           beneficial here.  
Suzuka West                The S-curves can be quite 
                           dangerous, but they do provide
                           excellent passing opportunities if
                           you can brake deeper than the cars
                           in front of you and/or have 
                           superior acceleration for corner
                           exits.  
Suzuka Grand Prix          This circuit will also be quite 
                           familiar to those who have played
                           F1-based and motorcycle-based 
                           games.  This is the most famous
                           circuit in Japan, and perhaps in
                           all of Asia.  
Road Atlanta National      This course provides steep
                           elevation changes, tempering 
                           significant straightaways with 
                           blind corners.   
Road Atlanta               This course provides steep
                           elevation changes, tempering 
                           significant straightaways with 
                           blind corners.  This course has 
                           been offered in other racing
                           games, so some players may
                           already be rather familiar with
                           the Road Atlanta circuit.  

There are also three official reverse courses: Reverse Brno, Reverse Donington National, and Reverse Donington Grand Prix. Of course, you can drive in reverse on any course at any time, but this is certainly NOT recommended, especially during a race!!!!!

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COMPLETELY SUBJECTIVE SECTION
This will likely be utterly useless information for some (unless these items miraculously happen to become answers on Jeopardy!), so this section should be taken with several grains of salt and a large raw salmon.

My Favorite Courses:
   Catalunya Grand Prix
   Le Mans
   Road Atlanta (full circuit)
   Suzuka Grand Prix

My Least Favorite Courses:
   Catalunya National
   Road Atlanta National
   Suzuka East
   Suzuka West

My Favorite Corners:
   Bugatti: Museum Curve
   Catalunya Grand Prix: Seat
   Le Mans: Mulsanne and Porsche Curve
   Road Atlanta: Turn 8 (the second-nastiest corner) and Turn
      13 (the nastiest corner, passing underneath Suzuka 
      Bridge)
   Road Atlanta National: Turn 12 (the nastiest corner,
      passing underneath Suzuka Bridge)
   Suzuka Grand Prix: Degner
   Suzuka West: Degner

My Least Favorite Corners:
   Bugatti: Dunlop Chicane
   Catalunya Grand Prix: Banc Sabadeau
   Catalunya National: Banc Sabadeau
   Donington Grand Prix: Turns 9-10
   Donington National: Turns 9-10
   Le Mans: Dunlop Chicane, White House
   Suzuka Grand Prix: Chicane

My Favorite Driving Conditions:
   Broad daylight, dry weather conditions
   Complete darkness, clear sky, with few trees or other 
      obstacles to block the view of the stars and moon
   Sunset with clear skies (especially in the Petit Le Mans
      at Road Atlanta)

My Least Favorite Driving Conditions:
   Hour after hour after hour after hour of non-stop
      incessant neverending water droplets dripping
      continuously from the dark clouds above

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DETAILS: LE MANS
This is the longest circuit of the game… and quite likely the reason players buy or rent this game!!! It is IMPERATIVE to learn this circuit flawlessly during daylight conditions, as visibility is unbelievably poor at night and in wet-weather conditions (although better than in the old Test Drive: Le Mans). The trick to successfully completing Time Trial here (and thus unlocking a car) is to find the best possible combination of small car size with strong acceleration and high top-end speed; however, you must begin Time Trial with at least 40% fuel, so you will certainly need to make a number of laps to reduce your fuel load — along with absolutely BETTER-THAN-FLAWLESS DRIVING — to even have a HOPE of besting the Goal Time of 3:34.000.

   SPECIAL NOTE 1: After driving all night long (especially
   in the full 24-hour race), the transition to daylight
   driving (especially under clear skies) can result in poor
   visibility of cars far ahead of you until your eyes
   adjust.  Be wary of your closing rate on slower, ‘unseen’
   cars far ahead, as you can suddenly find your front bumper
   banging the rear end of another vehicle.  

   SPECIAL NOTE 2: Lights are used for nighttime driving and
   other poor visibility conditions (primarily constant
   rain).  While the lights are great in poor visibility
   conditions, do not allow yourself to become too reliant
   upon them.  Once clear visibility returns, the lights are
   turned off (approximately 6:30AM in the full 24-hour
   race).  

Turn 1 (Dunlop Curve): This is a rather nice right-hand fade which can be taken flat-out. However, it may be a good idea to begin braking for Dunlop Chicane when exiting Dunlop Curve. An elevation change begins here.

Turns 2-4 (Dunlop Chicane): Given the continual upward slope through Dunlop Chicane, it is extremely easy to slip off the pavement on either side of the circuit… and both sides are filled with plenty of kitty litter. Braking well before entering the Dunlop Chicane is of UTMOST importance as the corners of the chicane are rather tight. At the beginning of a race, all the traffic can make this segment even more treacherous than it would be normally.

Straightaway: The significant hill crests as you pass underneath the big Dunlop tire.

Turns 5-6 (Red Mound S): This left-right chicane begins just after passing the Ferris Wheel on the left side of the course, and is a good reference point to use in picking your braking zone; note that the Bugatti circuit turns to the right here. The barriers are rather close to the pavement on both sides through the chicane, so any off-pavement excursions will result in sliding along the rails; this is especially important in case you carry too much speed through this chicane.

Turns 7-9 (Red Mound Curve): This is a set of three right-hand semi-corners which can usually be taken flat-out, unless you find yourself encumbered by traffic. However, keep a tight line to the apex of each of the three semi-corners, or you may find yourself with a few wheels in the sand and grass on the outside of the course. The outside of the final corner is actually paved (where the Le Mans circuit joins public roads come together), so this can be used as a good swing-out area if necessary, and can also be used to pass a small group of cars on the inside of the corner; beware the outside barrier here as you will be likely be carrying A LOT of speed.

Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight — Part I): This is the longest straightaway of the circuit, and very good top-end speeds can be achieved here, especially if you were able to blast your way through Red Mound Curve without even tapping the brakes. However, there is no room for error if you get involved in a three-abreast situation, as the barriers come almost directly up to the pavement. During the day, look for the distance-to-corner markers or else you will miss Motorola Chicane (flashing red lights alert you to the chicane at night and in poor-visibility conditions).

Turns 10-12 (Motorola Chicane): This is the same chicane format as the Dunlop Chicane (right-left-right), but wider and without the hill. Beware the barriers. In poor-visibility conditions, the first corner of the chicane is easily identifiable by the red lights; during the day, however, the chicane is very difficult to see from a distance, so be sure to look for the distance-to-corner markers.

Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight — Part II): Very good top-end speeds can be achieved here. However, there is no room for error if you get involved in a three-abreast situation, as the barriers come almost directly up to the pavement. During the day, look for the distance-to-corner markers or else you will miss Michelin Chicane (flashing red lights alert you to the chicane at night).

Turns 13-15 (Michelin Chicane): This is exactly like the Motorola Chicane, but is a left-right-left combination with a tighter initial turn. In poor-visibility conditions, the first corner of the chicane is easily identifiable by the red lights; during the day, however, the chicane is very difficult to see from a distance, so be sure to look for the distance-to-corner markers.

Straightaway (Hunaudieres Straight — Part III): Yet another long straightaway, but with a small fade to the right almost one-third of the way along its length. After clearing the small rise (similar to a bridge over a small country stream, about two-thirds of the way along the straightaway), look for the distance-to-corner markers for Mulsanne Curve.

Mulsanne: If you can carry enough speed and have sufficient tire grip, you can essentially treat both Mulsanne Hump and Mulsanne Curve as one long double-apex corner by riding up on the inside rumble strip of Mulsanne Curve. Mulsanne Hump and Mulsanne Curve together essentially form a 135-degree (double-apex) megacorner. It is very easy to go too wide exiting this megacorner, and CPU-controlled cars often will find themselves in the sand trap, so keep watch for such activity as you round Mulsanne Curve.

   Turn 16 (Mulsanne Hump): The distance-to-corner markers
   actually are for the following right-hand turn, but no one
   can afford to miss Mulsanne Hump, whose apex is almost
   exactly in line with the 100m marker and bounded on the 
   left by a nasty barrier.  

   Turn 17 (Mulsanne Curve): The distance-to-corner markers
   are actually for THIS corner.  This is a ninety-degree
   corner requiring moderate braking and a solid, clean
   racing line to keep out of the sand trap.  

Straightaway: This straightaway has three fades to the right along its length. At the apex of the third fade, begin braking for the Indianapolis Curve.

Turn 18 (Indianapolis Curve): This left-hand ninety-degree corner can easily be missed, so use plenty of braking beginning at the apex of the third fade along the previous straightaway. Do not cut this corner too sharp or you will likely bang the barrier on the inside of the turn.

Turn 19 (Arnage Curve): After a very brief straightaway, this is a right-hand right-angle corner. The trick here is to NOT come up to full speed following the Indianapolis Curve, thus saving your brakes a little (which is extremely importance in endurance races). Do not cut this corner too sharp or you will likely bang the barrier on the inside of the turn. If you go wide, say ‘Bonjour’ (daytime) or ‘Bonsoir’ (evening/nighttime) to the outside barrier. Likewise, if you carry too much speed over the inside rumble strip, countersteer immediately to avoid a spin (and that still may not help).

Straightaway: This ‘straightaway’ has four fades (left-right-left-right). After the fourth fade, get ready for the fast-approaching Porsche Curve.

‘Chicane:’ This next segment essentially forms an extra-wide right-left-left-right (‘bus stop’) chicane as it leaves the public roads. Extreme care is required here, as the pavement is extreme narrow.

   Turn 20 (Porsche Curve): Light braking will likely be
   needed here, although experts can probably blast through
   here at top speed if not encumbered by traffic.  An
   uphill rise begins here.  

   Turn 21: The rise crests here as the course turns to the
   left.  

   Turns 22-23: The course elevation drops at Turn 22 as the
   circuit turns to the left, making this corner more
   challenging than it would at first appear.  Turn 23
   follows immediately, turning to the right.  

Turns 24-27 (Prairie): There are four significant semi-corners (right-left-right-left) here. Top speed can be carried all the way through Prairie, but only with a flawless racing line, else you risk dropping a wheel in the grass and slowing yourself down. On exiting Turn 27, the single yellow line marking the Pit Entry begins on the right.

Turns 28-31 (White House): These tight left-right-left-right S-curves are the finale of a rather lengthy lap of the Le Mans circuit. The pavement here is extremely narrow, making safe passing impossible; if any passing is to be done here, it is only by ramming another car off the pavement and into the kitty litter. The entire area is surrounded by massive sand traps, so if you slip off the pavement, you will be slowed almost to a snail’s crawl, losing valuable time and allowing those behind you to pass with the greatest of ease. A VERY brief straightaway separates the first left-right combination from the second. Note that to keep your time in this section to a minimum, you will need to make use of the rumble strips on the inside of each corner; however, if you come through ANY corner of White House carrying too much speed (especially in wet racing conditions), the car will bounce severely and perhaps spin or slide out into the kitty litter.

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DETAILS: BUGATTI
This is the permanent section of the Le Mans circuit. Bugatti is a rather technical circuit, so top-end speed is generally not the best way to set up a car here. Those familiar with the Nevers Magny-Cours F1 circuit will certainly appreciate its similarity to the four semi-parallel straightaways on the first half of the Bugatti circuit.

Turn 1 (Dunlop Curve): This is a rather nice right-hand fade which can be taken flat-out. However, it may be a good idea to begin braking for Dunlop Chicane when exiting Dunlop Curve. An elevation change begins here.

Turns 2-4 (Dunlop Chicane): Given the continual upward slope through Dunlop Chicane, it is extremely easy to slip off the pavement on either side of the circuit… and both sides are filled with plenty of kitty litter. Braking well before entering the Dunlop Chicane is of UTMOST importance as the corners of the chicane are rather tight. At the beginning of a race, all the traffic can make this segment even more treacherous than it would be normally.

Semi-parallel Straightaways: These four semi-parallel straightaways can produce an unexpected aural effect. Once traffic stretches out all around the circuit, whenever you are on the middle straightaways, you will almost certainly hear cars speeding past you on the straightaways to either side of you.

   Straightaway: The significant hill crests as you pass
   underneath the big Dunlop tire.  

   Turn 5 (Chapel): This is a rather tight right-hand hairpin
   which will require moderate breaking on entrance.  Chapel
   begins immediately after passing the tall Ferris Wheel on 
   the left.  

   Turn 6 (Museum Curve): This is a wide left-hand hairpin
   with an extensive sand trap to the outside of the
   pavement.  Of the three consecutive hairpins, this is by
   far the easiest to handle, allowing for most cars to still
   carry some considerable speed through the hairpin, but
   braking is still required before entry.  

   Turn 7 (Green Garage): Yet another tight right-hand
   hairpin requiring harsh braking.  If you miss your braking
   zone, you will find yourself beached in the kitty litter
   to the outside of the hairpin.  

Turns 8-9 (Ox Way S): Hard braking is required here after the fourth of the semi-parallel straightaways. Beware the sand traps to the outside of each corner, and make sure not to overcompensate and roll through the grass on the inside of the corners. Turn 8 begins immediately after passing underneath the Bridgestone bridge.

Turns 10-11 (Blues S): Brake early or Turn 10 will have you either out in the kitty litter or spinning around in the middle of the pavement. The right-handed Turn 10 is rather straightforward. However, there are then TWO pieces of pavement turning to the left. The official Turn 11 is the SECOND pavement, so do not turn too soon.

Turns 12-13 (Connection): Pit Entry is to the right immediately before entering Connection, so beware of slower cars here. The Connection complex is extremely complex, as the final chicanes and the Pit Entry of the Le Mans course rejoin the Bugatti course here. Just make two right-hand, ninety-degree turns at a moderate pace (likely making good use of the rumble strips) and you will soon find yourself safely back on the Pit Straight. The pavement here is extremely narrow, making safe passing impossible; if any passing is to be done here, it is only by ramming another car off the pavement and into the kitty litter.

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DETAILS: BRNO
Located in the Czech Republic, this is another rather technical circuit, with massive sand traps on the outside of every corner, and sand traps on the inside of many corners as well. A reverse race configuration is also available at Brno (unlocked simultaneously with Reverse Donington National and Reverse Donington Grand Prix). Fortunately, this is a rather wide circuit, so racing three-abreast is easily done without anyone endangering the other cars involved; four-wide racing, however, is certainly NOT recommended at Brno, especially when cornering!!!!!

Pit Straight: The Pit Lane barrier is set just far enough away from the official course (marked by the white line on the right side) that an unofficial paved lane is created. You can make use of this unofficial lane to pass several cars at once, especially on a standing start. However, beware of any cars exiting Pit Lane.

Turn 1: This is a relatively-fast right-hand J-turn requiring light to moderate braking on entry. For good lap times, a minimum speed of 100MPH/160KPH is required through Turn 1, but I have been able to successfully hold speeds over 110MPH before oversteering begins to take effect. If you can successfully hold such speeds here, Turn 1 is a great place to pass other cars. Do not drift off-course on the left, or you will be beached in the sand. A gentle fade to the left occurs on corner exit.

Turn 2: This left-hand corner will require moderate braking on entry to keep out of the sand. Again, good speed can be held through this corner, allowing you to pass one or two cars.

Turn 3: After a brief straightaway, this right-hand corner will require light braking to stay out of the sand.

Straightaway: The circuit begins its downhill run here.

Turn 4: Continuing downhill, this right-hand J-turn requires moderate braking as the car lightens.

Turn 5: A right-hand corner requiring light braking as the course continues downhill.

Turn 6: After a brief straightaway, the course continues downhill through this left-hand corner, which requires light braking. Do not go wide on exit or you will be caught out in the kitty litter.

Turn 7: Still continuing downhill, the course turns left here, requiring light braking. If you go wide, you will be out in the sand.

Turn 8: This right-hand J-turn requires moderate braking to keep from sliding out into the sand on the outside of the corner. The inside of the corner also has a sand trap, so do not cut this corner too short if you need to pass other cars here.

Turn 9: After a relatively long straightaway, the course has a right-hand downhill J-turn here requiring moderate braking. Drift left on exit, but do not go too wide or you will be beached in the sand.

Turn 10: The course finally ‘bottoms out’ and begins a gentle uphill climb at the entrance of this left-hand corner. Light braking is required here to keep from running out into the sand.

Turn 11: Almost immediately following Turn 10, this right-hand corner continues the uphill climb. Moderate braking is necessary here.

Turn 12: Still continuing uphill, use moderate braking for this left-hand corner to keep out of the sand.

Turn 13: The hill crests on entry to Turn 13. Use light or moderate braking here to stay out of the kitty litter. The single white line indicating Pit Entry begins just after the apex of Turn 13, so be mindful of cars slowing for Pit Entry.

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DETAILS: DONINGTON NATIONAL
This popular British venue is the host of many events, and has been included in other racing games. The outside of almost every corner has a very small strip of grass between the pavement and the sand trap. The only difference from the Donington Grand Prix course is that the two straightaways behind the Paddock Suite are bypassed.

Turn 1: This right-hand J-turn requires moderate braking, and plenty of patience at the start of a race as traffic really jams up here.

Turn 2: This is a long, gentle right-hand semi-corner, sloping downhill along its entire length.

Turn 3: Continuing downhill, this left-hand corner will only require light braking, if the brakes are needed at all. Due to the downhill slope, it may be difficult to see the apex of the corner as you approach.

Turn 4: Immediately after Turn 3, the course turns uphill to the right here, with light or moderate braking required.

Turn 5: After passing underneath the pedestrian bridge, the course turns to the left here. No braking is required.

Turn 6: This is really just a left-hand fade.

Turn 7: Moderate braking is necessary as the course continues uphill through this right-hand turn. The barrier on the left comes rather close to the pavement, so there is not much grass and sand to stop you if you miss your braking zone.

Turn 8: This lengthy, sweeping right-hand J-turn will require light braking to keep out of the grass and sand as the course continues slowly uphill. This corner opens out onto the longest straightaway at Donington.

Turns 9-10: Shortly after passing underneath the big Dunlop tire, begin braking for the chicane. This is a tight right-left combination. Barriers to the inside AND outside of Turn 9 prevent any shortcutting.

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DETAILS: DONINGTON GRAND PRIX
This popular British venue is the host of many events, and has been included in other games. The outside of almost every corner has a very small strip of grass between the pavement and the sand trap.

Turn 1: This right-hand J-turn requires moderate braking, and plenty of patience at the start of a race as traffic really jams up here.
Turn 2: This is a long, gentle right-hand semi-corner, sloping downhill along its entire length.

Turn 3: Continuing downhill, this left-hand corner will only require light braking, if the brakes are needed at all. Due to the downhill slope, it may be difficult to see the apex of the corner as you approach.

Turn 4: Immediately after Turn 3, the course turns uphill to the right here, with light or moderate braking required.

Turn 5: After passing underneath the pedestrian bridge, the course turns to the left here. No braking is required.

Turn 6: This is really just a left-hand fade.

Turn 7: Moderate braking is necessary as the course continues uphill through this right-hand turn. The barrier on the left comes rather close to the pavement, so there is not much grass and sand to stop you if you miss your braking zone.

Turn 8: This lengthy, sweeping right-hand J-turn will require light braking to keep out of the grass and sand as the course continues slowly uphill. This corner opens out onto the longest straightaway at Donington.

Turns 9-10: Shortly after passing underneath the big Dunlop tire, begin braking for the chicane. This is a tight left-right combination with NO room for error. The barrier on the inside of Turn 9 prevents shortcutting, and the sand trap to the inside of Turn 10 severely hinders anyone attempting to shortcut that corner.

Turn 11: After a significant straightaway, this is a tight right-hand hairpin turn onto another significant straightaway behind the Paddock Suite. Essentially, think of this as changing runways on an airport circuit (such as at Sebring) and you should do fairly well here. Moderate braking is required here. If you miss your braking zone, there is a wide patch of kitty litter to the outside of the corner.

Turn 12: The final corner of the circuit is a left-hand tight hairpin. Again, think of this as changing runways on an airport circuit. Moderate braking will be needed here.

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DETAILS: CATALUNYA NATIONAL
The Catalunya circuit is challenging, but good speeds can be carried along much of the circuit. For observers and drivers alike, plenty of action can be found at the Catalunya National circuit.

Pit Straight: As usual, incredible speeds can be attained here. Watch for cars rejoining the race from the right side of the straightaway.

Turn 1: This right-hand hairpin is rather tight, and rejoins the Grand Prix circuit just short of Wuth. Heavy braking will be needed to slow sufficiently for Turn 1 after the high speed attained on the Pit Straight.

Turn 2 (Wuth): With a good racing line, you should be able to brake lightly to clear this semi-blind, slightly-downhill, left-hand corner. Beware the barrier on the inside of Wuth. The exit of Wuth has an immediate fade to the right.

Turn 3 (Campsa): This right-hand corner can be taken at full speed, although other cars will usually swing wide-left and brake slightly while rounding this corner. Note that the official circuit is to the right; do not drive directly ahead onto another patch of pavement, or you will lose plenty of time. Also, in a twilight or night race, Campsa is extremely difficult to see unless the taillights of other cars mark the corner for you, so approach Campsa with extreme caution.

Turn 4 (La Cacsa): Severe braking is required for this left-hand corner. While not suggested, you may be able to pass other cars on braking here. As with Wuth, stay off the rumble strips and grass on the inside of the turn, or you will risk losing control of the car. This is a ‘J’ turn, and the corner seems to go on forever before you reach the exit.

Turn 5 (Banc Sabadeau): Shortly following Turn 4, moderate or heavy braking will be needed here for the right-hand, upward-sloping corner. This is also a ‘J’ turn which is nearly a double-apex corner. If you need a recovery area anywhere on the course, it will most likely be here. It is possible to pass slower cars here by tightly hugging the inside of the turn, even running the right-side tires on the rumble strips.

Turn 6: Light braking may be needed for this right-hand corner. The key here is to truly hug the inside of the turn and accelerate strongly through the exit. Watch for slow cars here preparing to go to Pit Lane for servicing.

Turn 7: Entering this right-hand corner, the Pit Lane begins on the right, so be on the lookout for very slow cars here. If you take this final corner too tightly, or make a VERY late decision to go to the pits, you will likely damage the front of the car on a barrier.

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DETAILS: CATALUNYA GRAND PRIX
The Catalunya circuit is challenging, especially the two hairpins and the final corners of the race. Those who have played recent F1-based games will already have good familiarity with the Catalunya Grand Prix circuit.

Pit Straight: As usual, incredible speeds can be attained here. Watch for cars rejoining the race from the right side of the straightaway.

Turn 1 (Elf): This is a right-hand corner which requires light braking. Be careful not to hug the inside of the corner too tightly, or you will bang the right side of the car on the barrier. Strong acceleration out of Turn 1 creates great passing opportunities all the way to Repsol. Attempting to take Turn 1 at top speed will either cause you to lose control as you run up on the rumble strips, or send you too far off course to survive Turn 2 (IF you survive the kitty litter).

Turn 2 (Elf): Immediately following Turn 1, the left-hand Turn 2 can usually be taken at top acceleration. With strong acceleration out of Turn 1, this is a prime passing zone.

Turn 3 (Seat): A sweeping right-hand increasing-radius corner which can be taken at full speed, this is also a good place to pass slower cars, especially if you have the inside line. If you were able to slow enough for Turn 1, you can begin acceleration exiting Turn 1 and keep standing on the accelerator all the way through Seat, giving you an excellent speed advantage over many other cars which might be in the area.

Turn 4 (Repsol): This is a semi-blind right-hand hairpin corner which requires moderate or heavy braking. The barrier on the inside of the corner rests almost directly against the track, and blocks your view around the corner. This can actually be a good place to pass on braking, but only with extreme caution. Don’t come too hot into this corner or else you will find yourself in the sand. After clearing the first 90 degrees of Repsol, you should be able to accelerate fairly well if not encumbered by traffic.

Turn 5: After a very short straightaway, this is a semi-blind left-hand hairpin, a bit tighter than Turn 4. Moderate or heavy braking will be needed here, or you will definitely be using the recovery area.

Straightaway: This straightaway fades to the left. Good acceleration out of Turn 5 can create passing opportunities, especially in the braking zone for Wuth.

Turn 6 (Wuth): With a good racing line, you should be able to brake lightly to clear this semi-blind, slightly-downhill, left-hand corner. Beware the barrier on the inside of Wuth. The exit of Wuth has an immediate fade to the right.

Turn 7 (Campsa): This right-hand corner can be taken at full speed, although other cars will usually swing wide-left and brake slightly while rounding this corner. Note that the official circuit is to the right; do not drive directly ahead onto another patch of pavement, or you will lose plenty of time. Also, in a twilight or night race, Campsa is extremely difficult to see unless the taillights of other cars mark the corner for you, so approach Campsa with extreme caution.

Turn 8 (La Cacsa): Severe braking is required for this left-hand corner. While not suggested, you may be able to pass other cars on braking here. As with Wuth, stay off the rumble strips and grass on the inside of the turn, or you will risk losing control of the car. This is a ‘J’ turn, and the corner seems to go on forever before you reach the exit.

Turn 9 (Banc Sabadeau): Shortly following Turn 8, moderate or heavy braking will be needed here for the right-hand, upward-sloping corner. This is also a ‘J’ turn which is nearly a double-apex corner. If you need a recovery area anywhere on the course, it will most likely be here. It is possible to pass slower cars here by tightly hugging the inside of the turn, even running the right-side tires on the rumble strips.

Turn 10: Light braking may be needed for this right-hand corner. The key here is to truly hug the inside of the turn and accelerate strongly through the exit. Watch for slow cars here preparing to go to Pit Lane for servicing.

Turn 11: Entering this right-hand corner, the Pit Lane begins on the right, so be on the lookout for very slow cars here. If you take this final corner too tightly, or make a VERY late decision to go to the pits, you will likely damage the front of the car on a barrier.

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DETAILS: SUZUKA EAST
This is the initial section of the world-famous Suzuka Grand prix circuit. One of the most famous sights of the ‘circuit’ is the large Ferris Wheel on the left behind the grandstands as cars pass along the Pit Straight.

Pit Straight: Good speeds can be achieved here with strong acceleration out of the chicane. The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right near the end of the Pit Straight.

Turn 1: This right-hand hairpin requires moderate braking on approach, and you will likely be tapping the brakes through the hairpin itself. This begins an uphill climb, and it is difficult to see the left side of the pavement on exit, so be careful not to run too wide and end up out in the sand. There is really no reason to overrun the hairpin on entry, as the corner is quite easily identifiable.

Turns 2-5 (S Curves): This is by far the hardest section of the course — tight left-right-left-right corners. The first of the ‘S’ curves can likely be taken at full speed, with light or moderate braking for Turn 3. Turn 4 can be taken either flat-out (not suggested) or with light braking. No matter what, slam on the brakes for Turn 5, the tightest corner of the ‘S’ section. This entire segment of the course continues the uphill climb, making Turn 5 particularly more difficult. There is ample recovery room on either side of the course through the uphill ‘S’ section. The ‘S’ section is a good place to pass slower cars, if you have enough confidence in your brakes to pass during corner entry. No matter what, you will NOT be surviving the ‘S’ curves unless you use the brakes generously… or use only second or third gear (definitely not suggested if you want to win).

Turn 6: The course continues gently uphill as it makes a wide hairpin turn back toward the Start/Finish Line. It is very easy to slip off the outside of the pavement here, so exercise extreme caution here. This is also a great place to pass other cars on braking on corner entry. If your chosen car has great acceleration, it will certainly be of benefit here on exit.

Turn 7: After a very brief straightaway, the circuit turns gently to the right. No breaking is required here.

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DETAILS: SUZUKA WEST
This is the latter two-thirds of the Grand Prix circuit, with its own Pit Lane which is not used for F1 Grand Prix competition. This portion includes the world-famous figure-eight crossover.

Pit Straight: The Pit Lane Entry is on the right just after exiting Spoon.

Turn 1 (130R): Shortly after crossing the bridge, the course turns to the left. Some braking is required here. Prepare for the upcoming hairpin.

Turn 2: This right-hand hairpin comes before what would be Chicane on the Grand Prix circuit, and brings you back out just short of Degner. Moderate to heavy breaking will be required to successfully clear Turn 2.

Turn 3 (Degner): Here, the course turns to the right in anticipation of the figure-eight pattern. Light braking will likely be required, but it is possible to speed through here without braking. To the outside of the course is a wide expanse of grass and kitty litter in case you overrun the corner.

Turn 4 (Degner): The final right-hand corner before passing underneath the bridge, this turn is tighter than the previous corner, thus moderate braking and a steady racing line will be required here. This is also another prime passing zone. Take care not to overrun Turn 8, as there is not much recovery room between the pavement and the barrier.

Straightaway: Accelerate strongly out of Degner and you should be able to pass one or two cars as you race underneath the bridge. The course fades to the right here before reaching the tight Hairpin.

Turn 5 (Hairpin): This is a tight left-hand hairpin which begins the next uphill segment of the Suzuka circuit. It is possible to shortcut a little here, but the grass combined with the angle of the hill here will really slow you down and perhaps cause you to spin and/or slide, especially in wet conditions. Be careful not to accelerate too soon, or you will be out in the grass. There is a sizeable patch of kitty litter for those who miss the hairpin completely.

Turn 6: Continuing the uphill run, the course here makes a wide sweep to the right. Any braking here means losing track positions. The circuit here is rather bumpy, especially in wet conditions.

Turns 7 and 8 (Spoon): This is a tricky pair of left-hand corners, in a decreasing-radius ‘U’ formation. The first corner is fairly standard, requiring only a little braking. However, Turn 8 is both tighter AND slopes downhill, so judicious usage of brakes and a pristine racing line are both important here, especially if attempting to pass a slower vehicle. If you misjudge any single corner at Suzuka, it will be Turn 8; fortunately, there is plenty of recovery room on both sides of the pavement here. However, do not roll up on the rumble strips or the grass on the inside of Turn 8, as that will almost certainly cause you to lose control and likely spin.

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DETAILS: SUZUKA GRAND PRIX
This world-famous circuit in figure-eight style is used for many forms of auto and motorcycle racing; as such, those who have played other racing games (such as Moto GP World Tour, or F1 Championship Season 2000) may already have some familiarity with the Suzuka circuit. One of the most famous sights of the ‘circuit’ is the large Ferris Wheel on the left behind the grandstands as cars pass along the Pit Straight.

Pit Straight: Good speeds can be achieved here with strong acceleration out of the chicane. The Pit Lane rejoins the course from the right near the end of the Pit Straight.

Turn 1: This right-hand hairpin requires moderate braking on approach, and you will likely be tapping the brakes through the hairpin itself. This begins an uphill climb, and it is difficult to see the left side of the pavement on exit, so be careful not to run too wide and end up out in the sand. There is really no reason to overrun the hairpin on entry, as the corner is quite easily identifiable.

Turns 2-5 (S Curves): This is by far the hardest section of the course — tight left-right-left-right corners. The first of the ‘S’ curves can likely be taken at full speed, with light or moderate braking for Turn 3. Turn 4 can be taken either flat-out (not suggested) or with light braking. No matter what, slam on the brakes for Turn 5, the tightest corner of the ‘S’ section. This entire segment of the course continues the uphill climb, making Turn 5 particularly more difficult. There is ample recovery room on either side of the course through the uphill ‘S’ section. The ‘S’ section is a good place to pass slower cars, if you have enough confidence in your brakes to pass during corner entry. No matter what, you will NOT be surviving the ‘S’ curves unless you use the brakes generously… or use only second or third gear (definitely not suggested if you want to win).

Turn 6 (Dunlop Curve): This sweeping left-hand corner is the crest of the initial uphill segment of the course, and can be taken at full acceleration.

Turn 7 (Degner): Here, the course turns to the right in anticipation of the figure-eight pattern. Light braking will likely be required, but it is possible to speed through here without braking. To the outside of the course is a wide expanse of grass and kitty litter in case you overrun the corner.

Turn 8 (Degner): The final right-hand corner before passing underneath the bridge, this turn is tighter than the previous corner, thus moderate braking and a steady racing line will be required here. This is also another prime passing zone. Take care not to overrun Turn 8, as there is not much recovery room between the pavement and the barrier.

Straightaway: Accelerate strongly out of Degner and you should be able to pass one or two cars as you race underneath the bridge. The course fades to the right here before reaching the tight Hairpin.

Turn 9 (Hairpin): This is a tight left-hand hairpin which begins the next uphill segment of the Suzuka circuit. It is possible to shortcut a little here, but the grass combined with the angle of the hill here will really slow you down and perhaps cause you to spin and/or slide, especially in wet conditions. Be careful not to accelerate too soon, or you will be out in the grass. There is a sizeable patch of kitty litter for those who miss the hairpin completely.

Turn 10: Continuing the uphill run, the course here makes a wide sweep to the right. Any braking here means losing track positions. The circuit here is rather bumpy, especially in wet conditions.

Turns 11 and 12 (Spoon): This is a tricky pair of left-hand corners, in a decreasing-radius ‘U’ formation. The first corner is fairly standard, requiring only a little braking. However, Turn 12 is both tighter AND slopes downhill, so judicious usage of brakes and a pristine racing line are both important here, especially if attempting to pass a slower vehicle. If you misjudge any single corner at Suzuka, it will be Turn 12; fortunately, there is plenty of recovery room on both sides of the pavement here. However, do not roll up on the rumble strips or the grass on the inside of Turn 12, as that will almost certainly cause you to lose control and likely spin.

Straightaway: Power out of Spoon and rocket down the straightaway, passing multiple cars. After you cross the bridge, start thinking about Chicane.

Turn 13 (130R): Shortly after crossing the bridge, the course turns to the left. Some braking is required here. Also, look for cars on the right slowing for the Pit Lane entry just before the chicane.

Turns 14-16 (Chicane): This is a very tricky part of the course. The chicane begins with a moderate turn to the right, then a tight left-hand corner, then ends with a wider turn to the right and empties out onto the Pit Straight. The inside of the chicane is filled with sand AND barriers. Be careful coming out of Turn 15 so that you don’t go too wide and bump the right side of the vehicle on the Pit Lane barrier.

Pit Entry: The Pit Lane begins to the right just before Chicane. Note that the Pit Entry is the SECOND patch of pavement to the right coming off the main course.

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DETAILS: ROAD ATLANTA
This circuit is perhaps most famous for its final turns, a blind right-hand corner on a severe downhill slope beginning just as the cars pass underneath Suzuki Bridge, then a fast right-hand corner onto the Pit Straight. Good speeds overall can be obtained at Road Atlanta, but there are still a number of challenging corners to tax the drivers and their cars.

Pit Straight: This is the point of lowest elevation on the circuit.

Turn 1: This seemingly-neverending J-turn begins the circuit’s long uphill climb; the first two-thirds of the turn is rather significant, with the radius slowly increasing for the last third of the corner as the course climbs steeply uphill. Light braking is suggested here, and perhaps even moderate braking will be preferred by many players, but it is possible to speed through Turn 1 at top speed with NO braking. However, with little or no braking, if you do not have sufficient tire grip, you will slide out into the grass and bang the barrier on the outside of Turn 1. If you have an oversteer condition, expect to spin right at Pit Exit (at the end of the significant portion of the turn), and just hope that no one is coming out of Pit Lane at that very moment!!! If competing in the Petit Le Mans, the light on the inside of Turn 3 can overpower the glare from competitors’ taillights as you climb the steep hill out of Turn 1 and into Turn 2, thus causing you to misjudge the distance to the next vehicle in front of you and potentially contributing to an incident, so exercise great caution here (moreso than usual) when racing at night.

Turns 2-4: At a momentary plateau in track elevation, the left-right-left semi-chicane can be a surprise. The apex of Turn 2 is unsighted on entry. Turn 2 requires at least light braking to keep on the pavement. Turn 3 requires moderate braking, although light braking is possible if you drop the right-side tires in the small patch of sand on the inside of Turn 3. Turn 4 can often be taken at top speed, although light braking may be necessary to stay on the pavement. With fresh tires and excellent reflexes, this complex can be taken at top speed, but be ready to countersteer and/or slam on the brakes, especially when exiting Turn 4. This complex is also one of the areas where CPU-controlled cars are likely to spin out or otherwise run off-course, so be constantly wary here.

Turns 5-7 (S Curves): The course begins a gentle downhill slope just before the entry of Turn 5, a right-hand corner which can be taken flat-out. Turn 6 begins the next uphill stage as the pavement turns to the left; again, this can be taken at top speed. The right-hand Turn 7 can also be taken at top speed, however, it is best to begin braking for Turn 8 here.

Turn 8: This is the second-nastiest place on the Road Atlanta circuit. This blind left-hand corner requires moderate or severe braking as the hill (now a mini-mountain) climbs steeply, cresting just beyond the exit of Turn 8. If you miss the braking zone, you will find yourself in a sand trap. If you can get past that, however, there is another paved road which will rejoin the official course. If you get beyond THAT, however, you will bang a barrier. Only experts will be able to successfully clear this nasty corner (if not blocked by other cars) at over 100MPH/160KPH.

Straightaway: The mini-mountain crests shortly beyond the exit of Turn 8. In terms of elevation, this straightaway is essentially a roller-coaster ride, but the general trend is downhill.

Turn 9: Moderate braking for this ninety-degree right-hand corner is required, but there is kitty litter to collect you if you miss the braking zone. There are two pieces of pavement turning right here; the first is the sealed-off Pit Entry for other racing series, so do not use the first turn-off.

Turn 10: After a very short straightaway, the course again makes a ninety-degree right-hand turn here. Moderate braking is again required to keep out of the grassy recovery area.

Straightaway: This ‘straightaway’ has several fades along its length. After the first fade to the left, the course resumes an uphill slope. Beginning with the repaved section just after the fade to the right, the course begins its overall downhill trend.

Turns 11-12: This nasty left-right chicane requires plenty of advance braking, or you will be caught out in the grass/sand/barrier-filled zone on the inside of Turn 12. Be careful not to run wide exiting Turn 12, as the outside of Turn 12 also has plenty of sand to stop runaway vehicles.

Turn 13: This is by far the nastiest place on the circuit. As you pass underneath Suzuki Bridge, the course has its most significant elevation drop, resulting in cars lightening to the point that — depending on your speed and racing line — they may momentarily leave the ground!!!!! This is a blind right-hand corner (due to the significant elevation drop) which can actually be taken at full-throttle, but light braking is really the preferred method of success here (at the very least, be prepared to suddenly jam on the brakes anyhow, just in case). Edge to the right as you approach Suzuki Bridge and you should be okay; if you carry enough speed, by running your right-tide tires just off the pavement, the momentary lifting of your car will allow you to clear the small grass/sand patch without ever toughing the ground, thus without any loss of speed. However, Pit Entry is on the right just beyond Suzuki Bridge, so beware of slowing cars. If you do have trouble here, make use of the ‘extra’ paved lanes on the left (which actually go to a Pit Lane used for other racing series) until you can edge back onto the official course.

Turn 14: This is the final, right-hand corner of the circuit. Unless encumbered by traffic, this corner can be taken at top acceleration.

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DETAILS: ROAD ATLANTA NATIONAL
This circuit is perhaps most famous for its final turns, a blind right-hand corner on a severe downhill slope beginning just as the cars pass underneath Suzuki Bridge, then a fast right-hand corner onto the Pit Straight. Good speeds overall can be obtained at Road Atlanta National, but there are still a number of challenging corners to tax the drivers and their cars.

Pit Straight: This is the point of lowest elevation on the circuit.

Turn 1: This seemingly-neverending J-turn begins the circuit’s long uphill climb; the first two-thirds of the turn is rather significant, with the radius slowly increasing for the last third of the corner as the course climbs steeply uphill. Light braking is suggested here, and perhaps even moderate braking will be preferred by many players, but it is possible to speed through Turn 1 at top speed with NO braking. However, with little or no braking, if you do not have sufficient tire grip, you will slide out into the grass and bang the barrier on the outside of Turn 1. If you have an oversteer condition, expect to spin right at Pit Exit (at the end of the significant portion of the turn), and just hope that no one is coming out of Pit Lane at that very moment!!!

Turns 2-4: At a momentary plateau in track elevation, the left-right-left semi-chicane can be a surprise. The apex of Turn 2 is unsighted on entry. Turn 2 requires at least light braking to keep on the pavement. Turn 3 requires moderate braking, although light braking is possible if you drop the right-side tires in the small patch of sand on the inside of Turn 3. Turn 4 can often be taken at top speed, although light braking may be necessary to stay on the pavement. With fresh tires and excellent reflexes, this complex can be taken at top speed, but be ready to countersteer and/or slam on the brakes, especially when exiting Turn 4. This complex is also one of the areas where CPU-controlled cars are likely to spin out or otherwise run off-course, so be constantly wary here.

Turns 5-7 (S Curves): The course begins a gentle downhill slope just before the entry of Turn 5, a right-hand corner which can be taken flat-out. Turn 6 begins the next uphill stage as the pavement turns to the left; again, this can be taken at top speed. The right-hand Turn 7 can also be taken at top speed, however, it is best to begin braking for Turn 8 here.

Turn 8: Moderate braking is heavily suggested here as you reach the top of the hill during a left-hand turn.

Turn 9: After a short straightaway, Turn 9 is a gentle left-hand turn which requires no braking as the course rejoins the full Road Atlanta circuit.

Straightaway: Beginning with the repaved section just after the fade to the right, the course begins its overall downhill trend.

Turns 10-11: This nasty left-right chicane requires plenty of advance braking, or you will be caught out in the grass/sand/barrier-filled zone on the inside of Turn 11. Be careful not to run wide exiting Turn 11, as the outside of Turn 11 also has plenty of sand to stop runaway vehicles.

Turn 12: This is by far the nastiest place on the circuit. As you pass underneath Suzuki Bridge, the course has its most significant elevation drop, resulting in cars lightening to the point that — depending on your speed and racing line — they may momentarily leave the ground!!!!! This is a blind right-hand corner (due to the significant elevation drop) which can actually be taken at full-throttle, but light braking is really the preferred method of success here (at the very least, be prepared to suddenly jam on the brakes anyhow, just in case). Edge to the right as you approach Suzuki Bridge and you should be okay; if you carry enough speed, by running your right-tide tires just off the pavement, the momentary lifting of your car will allow you to clear the small grass/sand patch without ever toughing the ground, thus without any loss of speed. However, Pit Entry is on the right just beyond Suzuki Bridge, so beware of slowing cars. If you do have trouble here, make use of the ‘extra’ paved lanes on the left (which actually go to a Pit Lane used for other racing series) until you can edge back onto the official course.

Turn 13: This is the final, right-hand corner of the circuit. Unless encumbered by traffic, this corner can be taken at top acceleration.

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DETAILS: REVERSE COURSES
I leave it to you to figure out how to handle the three reverse courses: Reverse Brno, Reverse Donington National, and Reverse Donington Grand Prix. However, there are no (useful) distance-to-corner markers on the reverse courses, so make sure you TRULY know these courses in their normal configurations before attempting to compete on the reverse versions.

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UNLOCKING CIRCUITS (SPOILERS!!!!!)
Here is how to unlock new circuits. Initially-available circuits are so indicated. The following expanse of white space is to present a buffer so that those who wish to learn this on their own will not accidentally see it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Note: The locked circuits were opened using a closed prototype car (the Audi RBC from Audi Sport UK) with Intermediate Handling and easy AI Driver Skill at 3 laps per race. If your quest is to open all the courses as quickly as possible, why make it any harder on yourself than absolutely necessary?????

Le Mans                    Initially available
Bugatti                    Win at Le Mans in Quick Race
Brno                       Win at Suzuka West in Quick Race
Donington National         Initially available
Donington Grand Prix       Win at Catalunya National in Quick
                              Race
Catalunya National         Win at Road Atlanta National in 
                              Quick Race
Catalunya Grand Prix       Win at Road Atlanta in Quick Race
Suzuka East                Initially available
Suzuka West                Win at Donington National in Quick
                              Race
Suzuka Grand Prix          Win at Bugatti in Quick Race
Road Atlanta National      Initially available
Road Atlanta               Win at Suzuka East in Quick Race
Reverse Courses:           Win at Donington Grand Prix in
   Brno                       Quick Race; all three Reverse
   Donington National         Courses are unlocked at once
   Donington Grand Prix

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UNLOCKING CARS (SPOILERS!!!!!)
Here is how to unlock all the cars in Le Mans 24 Hours. The initially-available cars are so indicated. Note that often, the same make and model of car is used by different teams (with different paint schemes and racing number). A multiplier (such as ‘x3’) means that the stated team has more than one ‘version’ of the specified car, with each ‘version’ differentiated by racing number.

Also, there are a few instances where identical cars (with different racing numbers) by the same team are not acquired together, but by completing separate sections of the game. In this case, these cars are listed on separate lines in the table below, with the notation ‘different car’ for all such lines after the first.

The following expanse of white space is to present a buffer so that those who wish to learn this on their own will not accidentally see it.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cars                  Teams             Procurement
--------------------  ---------------   ---------------------
Audi A8C              Audi Sport UK     Initially available
Audi R8 (x3)          Audi Sport Team   Win Le Mans 2000 at
                         Joest             24 minutes
Audi R8C              Audi Sport UK     0:40.000 or better at
                                           Suzuka East in
                                           Time Trial
Audi R8R (x2)         Audi Sport Team   Win Super Enduro
                         Joest             Championship
BMW V12 LM            Thomas Bscher     Win Petit Le Mans at
                         Promotion         30 minutes
BMW V12 LMR (x2)      BMW Motorsport    Win Winter Challenge
                                           Championship
Cadillac N LMP (x2)   Team Cadillac     Win Le Mans 2000 at
                                           10 minutes
Cadillac N LMP (x2)   Team Dams         Win Le Mans 2000 at
                                           10 minutes
Chrysler Viper GTS-R  Carsport Holland  Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           10 minutes
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Chamberlain       Initially available
                         Engineering
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Chamberlain       Win Rookie GT
   (different car)       Engineering       Championship
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Paul Belmondo     Initially available
                         Racing
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Team Goh          Initially available
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Team Oreca        Win Pro GT
   (x2)                                    Championship
Chrysler Viper GTS R  Team Oreca        1:00.000 or better at
   (different car)                         Donington National
                                           in Time Trial
Chrysler Viper        Team Oreca        Win Petit Le Mans at
   GTS-RT (x3)                             10 minutes
Chevrolet Corvette    Corvette Racing   Win Petit Le Mans at
   C5-R (x2)                               10 minutes
Courage C 36          La Filiere ELF    1:34.000 or better at
                                           Bugatti in Time 
                                           Trial
Courage C 52          Courage           1:45.000 or better at
                         Competition       Brno in Time Trial
Courage C             Pescarolo Sport   Win Le Mans 2000 at
   52-Peugeot                              24 minutes
Courage C 60-Judd     SMG               Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           30 minutes
Debora LMP2000-BMW    Bonnet Didier     Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           30 minutes
GT2                   Konrad            0:46.000 or better at
                         Motorsport        Road Atlanta
                                           National in Time 
                                           Trial
GT2 (different car)   Konrad            1:01.000 or better at
                         Motorsport        Suzuka West in
                                           Time Trial
GT2                   Larbre            1:01.000 or better at
                         Competition       Catalunya National
                                           in Time Trial
GT2                   Roock Racing      Win Rookie GT
                                           Championship
GT2                   Team Augusta      Initially available
                         Racing
Jaguar XJR9 LM        Jaguar            Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           100 minutes
Lancia LC2            Lancia            Win Le Mans 2000 at
                                           24 hours
Lister Storm GTL      Newcastle         1:47.000 or better at
                         Lister Storm      Suzuka Grand Prix
                                           in Time Trial
LMGTP (x2)            GTC Competition   Initially available
LMP                   JMB Competition   Initially available
LMP                   Joest Racing      1:09.000 or better at
                                           Road Atlanta in
                                           Time Trial
LMP                   Kremer Racing     Initially available
LMP                   Pilot Racing      1:34.000 or better at
                                           Catalunya Grand
                                           Prix in Time Trial
Lola B2K10-Ford       Konrad            Initially available
                         Motorsport
Lola B2K10-Judd       Team Rafanelli    Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           30 minutes
Lola B2K40-Nissan     Multimatic        Initially available
                         Motorsports
Marcos Mantara        Team Marcos       1:21.000 or better at 
   LM600                                   Donington Grand
                                           Prix in Time Trial
Nissan R390 (x2)      Nissan            Win Open Prototype
                         Motorsports        Championship
Nissan R390           Nissan            Win Prototype Enduro
   (different car)       Motorsports        Championship
Nissan R391           Nissan            Win Prototype Enduro
                         Motorsports        Championship
Panoz Esperante GTR   Panoz             Initially available
   (x2)                  Motorsports
Panoz LMP Spyder      Panoz             Win GT Endurance
   (x2)                  Motorsports       Championship
Panoz LMP-1 (x2)      Panoz             Win Le Mans 2000 at
                         Motorsports       24 minutes
Panoz LMP-1           Team Den Bla      Win Petit Le Mans at
                         Avis              30 minutes
Panoz LMP-1           TV Asahi Team     Win Le Mans 2000 at
                         Dragon            10 minutes
Panoz LMP07           Panoz             Win Le Mans 2000 at
                         Motorsports       240 minutes
Peugeot 905           Peugeot Talbot    Win Le Mans 2000 at
                         Sport             24 hours
Porsche 911 GT2       Freisinger        Initially available
                         Motorsport
Porsche 911 GT2       Konrad            Initially available
                         Motorsport
Reynard 2KQ-Judd      Johansson         Initially available
                         Matthews
                         Racing
Reynard 2KQ-Mopar     Mopar Team Oreca  Win Le Mans 2000 at
   (x2)                                    24 minutes
Reynard               ROC               Win Petit Le Mans at
   2KQ-Volkswagen                          30 minutes
   (x2)
Riley & Scott MKIII   Riley & Scott     Initially available
   S2                    Europe
Sauber C9             Sauber            Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           10 hours
WR LMP-Peugeot        Welter Gerard     Win Petit Le Mans at
                                           30 minutes
WR LMP-Peugeot        Welter Rachel     Initially available
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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WISH LIST
Here are some of the things I would personally like to see in future incarnation of the game:

1.) The Melbourne House/Infogrames promo is definitely cute, but extremely out of place in a racing game with a real-world emphasis. This promo desperately needs to be changed (or eliminated).

2.) Faster loading times overall. Many screens take an ENORMOUSLY long time to load, which can be rather frustrating. Learn some tips from the programmers of Tokyo Extreme Racer Zero and F1 2001 and Kinetica!!!

3.) More options for car set-up. There is certainly no need for exact gear ratios, etc., but more modification possibilities would add another level of challenge to the game.

4.) This is essentially a simulation game, so flags really should be added. At the very least, local and global yellows should be included.

5.) Add a/an (oval) test course. This would allow players to experiment with different cars and set-ups to try to find the fastest possible speeds, which can be very important in certain modes of the game.

6.) Damage modeling. I realize this can be a sticky issue in receiving licenses from car manufacturers, but damage modeling adds a lot of realism to the game, and forces the player to be extremely careful with the cars — this is especially true in the full versions of the Le Mans and Petit Le Mans races. Otherwise, bored players (like me!!!) are likely to purposely bang around the other cars on the circuit.

7.) At the bare minimum, Pit Stop times should be given at the end of a Pit Stop. Ideally, a Pit Stop Clock should be running when a car comes in for service.

8.) After an off-course excursion, a longer trail of grass/sand debris should be left behind on the pavement.

9.) In a Championship series, a Forfeit (or similar) option should be available in case the player wishes to skip a particular round. This can be especially valuable if a player has already won all the initial races in a Championship series and will win the series overall even if forfeiting one or two rounds.

10.) For those (like myself) with small television screens, much of the text-based information is FAR too small; numbers and letters run together, and the green and red colors also do not help much when trying to read specific information or numbers (with the lack of separation, 5 and 6 look too much alike, etc.). A larger font needs to be used, and an additional one-point or two-point spacing between the characters would also help greatly.

11.) When in a Pit Stop, why does rain ‘fall’ on the lens of the overhead camera!?!?!?!?!?! I have never seen such a phenomenon except in the 1980s Dungeons and Dragons cartoon series!!!!!

12.) Detail to corner workers. With such exquisite detail given to weather and lighting effects, the cardboard cutouts representing corner workers is completely, totally, absolutely, inadequately sub-par. (Note that this is most noticeable at Le Mans.) Even if they never do anything but stand behind the guardrails and watch the race unfold, the corner workers should at least be afforded 3-D rendering. Fortunately, the trees do not look like cardboard cut-outs, but they could certainly use some fleshing out as well.

13.) The Le Mans circuit needs MANY more timing points.

14.) Why can I put my car directly in front of another, slam on the brakes, and bring us BOTH to a full stop? Even worse in terms of realism, why can I then put us both IN REVERSE!?!?!?!?!?! The is simply ignorance of basic laws of physics, and is NOT acceptable!!!!!

15.) A brand-new, never-before-seen racing venue created by Infogrames would be a great addition to the game. This should be an unlockable feature, perhaps contingent upon unlocking ALL other items in the game.

16.) Unfortunately, every Pit Stop is the same. Some degree of randomness or non-coordination should be introduced to make Pit Stops a bit more realistic. For example, the tire changers rarely ever work exactly on the same cue; perhaps one tire changer is slightly slower on a given Pit Stop.

17.) Le Mans 24 Hours is GREAT overall!!! I strongly suggest that Infogrames do more endurance-racing games, perhaps one based on the American Le Mans Series (ALMS). At the very least, a game not necessarily specific to a series but featuring endurance races at many circuits around the world (such as the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 24 Hours of Spa) would be very interesting. Should this happen, advertise heavily on SpeedVision (in the States) during their coverage of such endurance races as the Petit Le Mans!!!

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CONTACT
For questions, rants, raves, comments of appreciation, etc., please contact me at: FEATHER7@IX.NETCOM.COM; also, if you have enjoyed this guide and feel that it has been helpful to you, I would certainly appreciate a small donation via PayPal (http://www.paypal.com/) using the above e-mail address.

To find the latest version of this and all my other PSX/PS2 game guides, please visit FeatherGuides (http://www.angelcities.com/members/feathersites/). The latest version will always be posted at FeatherGuides, while other Web sites may lag behind by several days in their regularly-scheduled posting updates.

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